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Brayne Talks Police Surveillance in First Novel Justice Event

February 1, 2021

By Belle Allmendinger

The Wilson Center welcomed Sarah Brayne, Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Texas at Austin, for the first installment of the Novel Justice series, which invites recently published criminal justice authors to present their work … Continue Reading →

Wilson Center’s Fall Students Bring Excitement, Passion for Criminal Justice Work

February 1, 2021

More than 40 students worked with the Wilson Center during the fall semester, with many continuing on with their projects this spring.

The Duke University undergraduates, law students, and graduate students worked across more than 10 projects, bringing their excitement … Continue Reading →

Online Conference Offers Scholars Maximum Feedback on Research

January 29, 2021

By Belle Allmendinger

The Wilson Center and Duke Law’s Ben Grunwald hosted the inaugural Empirical Criminal Law Roundtable in December.

“We are so pleased to have gathered together such an impressive and collegial group of scholars from across the country, … Continue Reading →

A Deeper Dive into the Recent Racial Equity Task Force Recommendations

January 22, 2021

By Annie Han

In December, North Carolina’s Task Force for Racial Equity in Criminal Justice (TREC) released 125 recommendations that encompass all aspects of the criminal justice system, starting with police contact, then the courts, and sentencing.

“North Carolina can … Continue Reading →

Connection, Trust, and Recovery: A New Series About Peer Support

January 14, 2021

Editor’s Note: If you’ve ever needed help but weren’t sure where to turn, then you know how important just one trustworthy guide can be. This blog post is the first of an occasional series called “Connection, Trust, and Recovery,” by … Continue Reading →

Wilson Center Executive Director to Return to Private Practice

January 1, 2021

Thomas Maher, who has served as Executive Director at the Wilson Center, will be departing to return to private practice on January 1.

Maher, who has taught criminal trial practice to Duke Law students for nearly 30 years, joined the … Continue Reading →

Student Post: Policing Term ‘Excited Delirium’ Should Not Justify Risky Ketamine Use

December 22, 2020

By De’Ja Wood

This summer, the murder of George Floyd seized national attention and sparked protests and discourse about police violence across the country. The ongoing discussion about police brutality led to an online petition calling for Colorado government agencies … Continue Reading →

CSAFE Presentation Examines Lay Jurors Perceptions of Forensics

December 18, 2020

Wilson Center researchers recently joined Nicholas Scurich, Associate Professor of Criminology, Law & Society, Vice Chair of the Department of Psychological Science at the University of California in Irvine, to explain their findings about lay jurors perceptions of forensic evidence.… Continue Reading →

Wandering Officer Research Could Create More Transparency in Police Hiring

December 17, 2020

By Sydney Gaviser

In light of high-profile police uses of force and subsequent protests this summer, police officers have been scrutinized more than ever. While some of the conversation has related to rules for police use of force and how … Continue Reading →

In-Depth Look at Wilson Center-Affiliated Bass Connections Projects

December 16, 2020

By: Alexi DeLara

Every year, Duke University offers the opportunity for undergraduate and graduate students to participate in Bass Connections, year-long research projects spanning a variety of topics. These students work as a team alongside faculty with a common end … Continue Reading →

Wilson Center Faculty Editorial: Legalizing Marijuana has Pros and Cons

December 15, 2020

The Greensboro News & Record ran an editorial this weekend from Dr. Marvin Swartz and Dr. Allison Robertson, Professor and Assistant Professor, respectively, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University.

From the article:

Recent elections brought resurgent national interest … Continue Reading →

New Mexico Supreme Court Raises Eyewitness ID Standards

December 14, 2020

The New Mexico Supreme Court recently cited Wilson Center research in a unanimous opinion that raises the standards for eyewitness identification under the state constitution.

The opinion in State v. Martinez affirmed a man’s convictions for killing two Santa Fe … Continue Reading →