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Wandering Officer Research Could Create More Transparency in Police Hiring

December 17, 2020

By Sydney Gaviser

In light of high-profile police uses of force and subsequent protests this summer, police officers have been scrutinized more than ever. While some of the conversation has related to rules for police use of force and how … Continue Reading →

In-Depth Look at Wilson Center-Affiliated Bass Connections Projects

December 16, 2020

By: Alexi DeLara

Every year, Duke University offers the opportunity for undergraduate and graduate students to participate in Bass Connections, year-long research projects spanning a variety of topics. These students work as a team alongside faculty with a common end … Continue Reading →

Wilson Center Faculty Editorial: Legalizing Marijuana has Pros and Cons

December 15, 2020

The Greensboro News & Record ran an editorial this weekend from Dr. Marvin Swartz and Dr. Allison Robertson, Professor and Assistant Professor, respectively, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University.

From the article:

Recent elections brought resurgent national interest … Continue Reading →

New Mexico Supreme Court Raises Eyewitness ID Standards

December 14, 2020

The New Mexico Supreme Court recently cited Wilson Center research in a unanimous opinion that raises the standards for eyewitness identification under the state constitution.

The opinion in State v. Martinez affirmed a man’s convictions for killing two Santa Fe … Continue Reading →

Judge Releases Order Appointing Thomas Maher to COVID-19 Prison Litigation

December 11, 2020

Wake County Superior Court Judge Vince Rozier released the order today appointing Wilson Center Director Thomas Maher as a special master in ongoing litigation in how the state is handling COVID-19 in prisons.

You can read more about the case … Continue Reading →

Researchers Propose Reforms on Police Use of Force in U.S. in new Article

December 10, 2020

Wilson Center Director Brandon Garrett and Vanderbilt Law School Criminal Justice Director Christopher Slobogin released a new article today in the German Law Article, “The Law on Police Use of Force in the United States.”

The Abstract:

Recent events in … Continue Reading →

Wilson Center Executive Director Appointed Special Master in NC COVID Litigation

December 4, 2020

Wilson Center Executive Director Thomas Maher has been appointed special master in the North Carolina litigation over the state prison system’s handling of COVID-19.

NAACP v. Cooper was filed earlier this year on behalf of several civil rights organizations, including … Continue Reading →

Eyewitness Conference Examines Importance, Pitfalls of Evidence

November 30, 2020

By: Sydney Gaviser

Eyewitness testimony is one of the oldest and most basic forms of trial evidence. If a witness sees a person commit a crime, reports to the police, and is able to identify the culprit in a lineup … Continue Reading →

Swartz: Closing Coverage Gaps to Promote Successful Prison Reentry for Persons with Mental Illness

November 25, 2020

Dr. Marvin S. Swartz, a professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke and a faculty member at the Wilson Center for Science and Justice at the Duke School of Law recently wrote a piece for Care4Carolina … Continue Reading →

Wilson Researchers to Bail Working Group: Durham Jail Population Down after Reforms but we Need Better Data

November 24, 2020

Researchers from the Wilson Center for Science and Justice have been scraping jail data in Durham in an effort to analyze pretrial policies and practices concerning the use of cash bail.

Wilson Center Research Director William E. Crozier, Center Director … Continue Reading →

Upcoming Paper Encourages Redistribution of Police Power

November 20, 2020

By De’Ja Wood

Over the summer, the murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minnesota, sparked national protests and discourse about the need for radical police reform. Organizers across the nation called on their local and state governments to defund the … Continue Reading →

Firearms Testimony: Should it be the Smoking Gun?

November 19, 2020

By Alexi DeLara 

In recent decades, researchers, judges, and journalists have raised questions regarding the reliability of a range of widely utilized forensic techniques. This includes, but is not limited to, forensic comparison methods, such as latent fingerprint and firearm … Continue Reading →